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So the drugstore I was in today had a perfume display. Here are some of the perfumes I came across.

werewolfchaos:

swiggityswagkarkatsafag:

the—apothecary:

jessicarabbit:

tenr0se:

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Dirt

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Funeral Home

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Weed

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Grass

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Holy Water

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Laundromat

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Leather

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New Zealand 

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Play-Doh 

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Wet Garden

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Tomato

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Suntan Lotion

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Sex on the Beach

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Riding Crop

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Soap

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And Finally, Swimming Pool

"No officer, for the last time, I did not smoke weed. Thats just my new perfume, cannabis flower"

I’ve wanted my whole life to smell like New Zealand

I lost it at Tomado. 

Not gonna lie.  I like their Laundromat and Gin & Tonic scents.

(Source: allo-nsy)

[…]If Snowpiercer had merely told the tale of an oppressed working class rising up to seize power from an evil overlord, it would already have been an improvement over most of the political messages in mainstream cinema. There are all sorts of nice touches in its portrayal of a declining capitalism that can maintain its ideological legitimacy even when it literally has no more bullets in its guns.

But the story Bong tells goes beyond that. It’s about the limitations of a revolution which merely takes over the existing social machinery rather than attempting to transcend it. And it’s all the more effective because the heart of that critique comes as a late surprise, from a character we might not expect.

[…]All too often, explicitly political art fails as both art and politics. Socialists shouldn’t put up with half-assed imitations of popular genres, nor with political messages denuded of anything but the lowest common denominator.

What makes Snowpiercer satisfying is that it commits neither error. It’s an engrossing and stylish movie, and its underlying themes go beyond merely pointing out class exploitation to challenge the logic of capital. It’s a movie that should be seen as widely as possible, if only so that Bong Joon-ho gets more chances to make movies for English-speaking audiences that badly need them.

Smash the Engine by Peter Frase | Jacobin Magazine (via filmantidote)

Let me just highlight one bit here especially:

But the story Bong tells goes beyond that. It’s about the limitations of a revolution which merely takes over the existing social machinery rather than attempting to transcend it. And it’s all the more effective because the heart of that critique comes as a late surprise, from a character we might not expect.

Ding!  I think a decent amount of reviewers have missed that very important point of the movie.

phoning-it-in:

graemem:

That’s Marvel editor Jordan White tweeting about the lack of big announcements from this year’s San Diego Comic-Con. When someone from Marvel Comics is complaining about a lack of announcements, you know that something’s gone screwy somewhere.

I feel like it’s almost too easy to say that this was the year where Comic-Con jumped the shark or whatever, as if my own jadedness about the show and “insider” status give me some sense of privileged apathy about the show that others don’t share, but there’s been something about the convention this year (and the coverage of it as well, for that matter) that’s suggested some kind of shift about the show this year that I can’t quite put my finger on.

That confused, strange lack of news that everyone was primed to expect from both Warner Bros. and Marvel Studios on Saturday— the complete lack of mention of movies that have either been rumored, in Warners’ case, or are known to be already in active development with directors and/or writers having already spoken publicly about them, in Marvel’s case—seems to crystalize the feeling that, somehow, everyone involved just decided to half-ass the show this year. Combine that with what feels like a scaled back presence by certain media outlets and what appears to be a general sense of “Wait, was anything new actually announced…?” that I’m seeing online, and it makes me wonder whether this is the shape of things to come for Comic-Con, or simply an off-year when compared with the razzle-dazzle of the last few years. And if 2014 is a transitionary year for SDCC, I’m not sure what it’s transitioning into.

This definitely felt like a year when studios got conservative and only promoted what is coming out within the next year rather than announcing what’s in the future. Could be a sign of how much that is flux, especially during such a crappy summer at the US box office. 

This is complete back-of-the-envelope musing on my part…but perhaps they learned something from Apple.  Apple doesn’t announce what they’re working on, if that’s something years in the future that may prove to be vaporware later on.  Now, the industries aren’t completely analogous (of course), but just maybe the studios are learning that it’s OK to hold back a bit and focus on what is coming out now.

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